Why Streetwear is Fashion's Current Biggest Trend

Why Streetwear Was Fashion Week's Biggest Trend

Alexander Wang kick-started Fashion's obsession with a streetwear influence by giving it his own unique high-end spin - it was the genesis of a whole new wave of fashion. Now, Vetements designer Demna Gvasalia has given us wave two: streetwear-inspired high fashion that is almost ironic, recycled from vintage with such a rawness that it is seemingly the opposite of what the luxury market is supposed to be about. 

Now, typical streetwear brands are seeing a boom as editors mix their usual Chanel and Gucci with Supreme, Adidas and other skate/surf/street brands. It's a remix that is changing everything. 

We can also thank Kanye West - his Yeezy collections for Adidas and even his 'Life of Pablo' merchandise are catching the industry off guard, connecting with youth culture in a way other brands haven't been achieving. 

Revolutionising menswear by designing pieces inspired by his personal background, Russian designer Gosha Rubchinskiy is also celebrating success thanks to his connection with youth and his slogan/motif driven approach to design. Clothing is often splashed with Russian flag colours or Soviet hammer and sickle symbols. Rubchinskiy regularly takes his inspiration from 90s leisurewear and frequently collaborates with skate collectives in Moscow, even scouting models at skate parks.

Fashion Week street style has also never been so in touch with what people really want to wear:  here's a round-up of how editors and attendees incorporated street wear touches into their sense of style during the Autumn/Winter 2016 Fashion Weeks.



Why Streetwear Was Fashion Week's Biggest Trend
Why Streetwear Was Fashion Week's Biggest Trend
Why Streetwear Was Fashion Week's Biggest Trend
Why Streetwear Was Fashion Week's Biggest Trend
Why Streetwear is Fashion's Current Biggest Trend
SHARE:

No comments

Post a Comment

Let us know what you think...

© The Front Row View. All rights reserved.
Blogger Template Made By pipdig